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MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA DR IWAN S.

Dr IWAN ‘S CYBERMUSEUM

THE FIRST INDONESIAN CYBERMUSEUM

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

The Driwan’s Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya Dr Iwan)

Showroom :
The Driwan’s
Travelling Cybermuseum
Showecase:
Map of Vietnam
Map of Vietnam

The Driwan’s Indochina Travel first and second days
THE EX INDOCHINA TRAVELLING (TIPS TOUR INDOCHINA)

1.HARI PERTAMA(FIRST DAYS)

a.DEPATURE FROM Jakarta indonesia with Air Asia afternoon( Berangkat dari Jakarta airpot SUTA)

b.Arrive 7.30 pm (Tiba di )Airport Tan son Nhat Ho Chi Minh City

Saigon – Ho Chi Minh City

1)Exchange money to dong(Tukar uang 100 dolar menjadi Dong)

2)Buy ticket to Hue(Beli Tiket Pesawat Ke Hue tgl 18 Juni pagi)

Departure Flight Options
Ho Chi Minh City , VN To HUE , VN Saturday, June 18

15 Jun

Wednesday

From 1,181,000 VND

16 Jun

Thursday

From 1,181,000 VND

17 Jun

Friday

From 1,181,000 VND

18 Jun

Saturday

From 1,181,000 VND

19 Jun

Sunday

From 1,181,000 VND

20 Jun

Monday

From 1,181,000 VND

21 Jun

Tuesday

From 1,181,000 VND

Departure Flight Options
Ho Chi Minh City , VN To Siem Reap , KH Saturday, June 18

15 Jun

Wednesday

From 3,494,000 VND

16 Jun

Thursday

From 3,494,000 VND

17 Jun

Friday

From 3,494,000 VND

18 Jun

Saturday

From 3,494,000 VND

19 Jun

Sunday

From 3,494,000 VND

20 Jun

Monday

From 3,494,000 VND

21 Jun

Tuesday

From 3,494,000 VND

, if not possible ,other alternative by ticket to (bila tidak ada tiket)alternative

By Ticket to(Beli tiket ke): Phon Phem. Or Siem riep Cambodia

3) Out of Airport(keluar airport) Get the best Taxi Vietnam Tourist Taxi

Vios Club
Toyota Vios’ taxis run amok in Ho Chi Minh City. Vehicles here are left hand drives.

Taxi Rate(Naik Taxi ,biaya) 80.000-120.000 dong(sekitar us $ 10.-).or by bus n0 152 to saigon bus station at the front of Benh than market HCM city

c.Go to Hotel(Perjalanan menuju )Phi Vu hotel,location at corner (lokasi persimpangan) Nguyen trai dan Lel Loi ,

look the map

didepannya ada patung Le Loi naik kuda.

Address(Alamat) 7 Nguyen Trai Street Ben Thanh Ward District 1 HCM City,tel (84.8)839 8479, email: phivuhotel@saigonnet.vn.

Via pengurus Hotel, bila tidak berhasil di airport dapt diurus tiket Vietnam airlines dari HCM city ke Hue hari ke tiga atau ke Phom phen

From the hotel, it takes just 15 minutes to walk to the Ben Thanh Market, and 10 minutes to the Reunification Palace, Notre Dame Cathedral, and the central post office.

Address: 7 Nguyen Trai St, Ben Thanh Ward, Ho Chi MinhTel: 84.8.28298479 email: phivuhotel@saigonnet.vn

Ben Thanh Market – Number one on any trip to Saigon Vietnam should be the historic Ben Thanh Market; located in District one, this market once the main market for locals is now focused squarely at the countries ever expanding international visitors, shoppers still get a feel for how the market was pre 1990 when Vietnam opened its doors to the west and international tourists. The variety of items for sale at Ben Thanh market is quite staggering with the sale of everything from Clothing, fabrics, cosmetics, fake Rolex and coffee thru to fruit vegetables and live animals.

Some facts about: Ben Thanh market dates back to the 17th century when it was an uncovered muddy market located near the Saigon wharf (Ben) and the Turtle Citadel (Quy Thanh) Ben Thanh Market has moved and been rebuilt twice with its current location/building being opened in March 1914, the buildings landmark clock tower is the symbol of Saigon

d. walking to market to night food (Jalan kaki ke pasar) ben than market ,for night shopping and food.(shoping dan makan malam,kepitingnya murah dan lezat)

Ben Thanh Market – Number one on any trip to Saigon Vietnam should be the historic Ben Thanh Market; located in District one, this market once the main market for locals is now focused squarely at the countries ever expanding international visitors, shoppers still get a feel for how the market was pre 1990 when Vietnam opened its doors to the west and international tourists. The variety of items for sale at Ben Thanh market is quite staggering with the sale of everything from Clothing, fabrics, cosmetics, fake Rolex and coffee thru to fruit vegetables and live animals.

Some facts about: Ben Thanh market dates back to the 17th century when it was an uncovered muddy market located near the Saigon wharf (Ben) and the Turtle Citadel (Quy Thanh) Ben Thanh Market has moved and been rebuilt twice with its current location/building being opened in March 1914, the buildings landmark clock tower is the symbol of Saigon

Back from market to phivu hotel II.through the beautiful garden and many native vietnamese sold fruit there.

THE SECOND DAY (Hari Kedua )

Pagi (morning)

1.breakfest broilled roaster(ayam bakar) at the small street in the front phivu hotel(makan pagi) ayam pangang dijalan depan phi vu hotel ) and the to the back to binh than market after turn to the right(menuju belakang Pasar Binh Than setelah belok kanan )

2.After that to Remant vietnam war museum look my profile in the front of museum

also the war remmant

at the left then walking to Pasteur street Đường – Pasteur – Street

in 6th Ward, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
,turn left to basilica Notre Dam

and the old saigon post office

(Selanjutnya ke Museum Perang HCM city dan Museum HCM city dan Cathedral Basilica serta Kantor pos Saigon)

Notre Dame Cathedral: Site of an old Pagoda
In 1959 with the approval of the Vatican the cathedral was named Notre Dame. It is supposed to sit on the site of an old pagoda. The neo-Romanesque architecture is complete with two-40m square bell towers. The garden outside is a popular gathering place.FROM THE NOTREDAM BASILICA TO THE OLD SAIGON POST OFFICE IN THE LEFT OF THE BASILICA.Address:Notre Dame Cathedral, 1 Commune of Paris, Dist. 1 FROM BASILICA KE OLD SAIGON POST OFFICEAND THEN BY BUS TO SAIGON BUS STATION IN THE FRONT OF BINH THAN MARKET.
Then Central Market or Ben Thanh Market is the biggest of the markets found in the city The building was formerly the main railway terminal. The market sells a large variety of goods from imported electronics and imported perfumes to local souvenirs, clothing and produce.

Ben Thanh market: Markets

While the crafts and other goods are on the inside of the market, the produce, flowers, and meats are generally sold on the pavements and alleys surrounding the building.Address: Ben Thanh Market, Le Loi St., Dist.1
Right outside the Ben Thanh Market on Le Loi Circle is the statues of General Tran Nguyen Han, a 15th-century warrior. The Circle is a busy roundabout for traffic.Address: Le Loi Blvd.
3.Take Bus to Saigon Bus Station(Naik Bus jurusan stasiun Saigon)

4.makan siang nasi campur(midday food pork rice at the front of bus station.

5.pasar antik(antique market)

6. shopping di pasar binh than sampai malam

Then Central Market or Ben Thanh Market is the biggest of the markets found in the city The building was formerly the main railway terminal. The market sells a large variety of goods from imported electronics and imported perfumes to local souvenirs, clothing and produce.
Ben Thanh market: Markets
While the crafts and other goods are on the inside of the market, the produce, flowers, and meats are generally sold on the pavements and alleys surrounding the building.Address: Ben Thanh Market, Le Loi St., Dist.1

Right outside the Ben Thanh Market on Le Loi Circle is the statues of General Tran Nguyen Han, a 15th-century warrior. The Circle is a busy roundabout for traffic.

Address: Le Loi Blvd.

the end @ copyright Dr Iwan Suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan’s Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya Dr Iwan)

Please Enter

DVWC SHOWROOM
(Driwan Vietnam War Cybermuseum)Showcase:

The Vietnam War Document
and
Postal History
1969-1975
THE VIETNAM WAR 1974
Vetnam War in 1974

_____________________________________
APAKAH ANDA SUDAH MELIHAT PAMERAN PERANG VIETNAM 1968-1975
DI Driwan Cybermuseum , bila belum segera klik
hhtp://www.Driwancybermuseum.wordpress.com
lihatlah salah satu frame pameran perang vietnam 1974. dibawah ini

January 1974

(a)Nguyen Cong Hoan story :

“While the 1973 Paris agreement was going on,the Communist were stepping up their military attack.By 1974 there really wasn’t anything left of that agreement.There was just no hope.There was no move the regime and no way to stop the Front.

(b)American service men , 110.000 had burnst their draftcard and 40.000 young men had evaded call-up by leaving for neighbouring Canada and for Europe.(D)

(c)January.30th1974

(a)Air mail covers from Indonesian KONGA V/ICCS Region V Saigon send to SKOMDAK III (West Sumatra Police Headquaters ) Padang-Sumbar, overprint INDONESIA , with stamps rate 81 Dong (7 stamps) with CDS TAN AN 30-1-1974 ( My first Postal History of Vietnam war was Given by Police Mayor. Suroto to me as Medical Police Inspectur in 1975, from this postal history I started to collect Vietnam war Postal history –auth)

(b) ICCS Communications Center Ton Son Nhut, the photo of Indonesian Garuda Mission army and Police in the front of that centers (This photo was given to me from Indonesia national Police Captain “red arrow” who joined the Garuda IV Indonesia ICCS Vietnam auth)

(c) Unused Free Port Special letter sheet Garuda IV Indonesia ICCS Vietnam, Garuda was “Eagle” Indonesia National emblem.(PH)

(d)Indonesian Mayor General Wiyogo Atmodarminto , commander of the Ivth Garuda Mission to Vietnam inspecting his men

(e)The Indonesia participation in Upholding World Order ICCS in Vietnam 1973.-1975 under Garuda IV,V and VII.

In performing its task, ICCS met many difficulties due to the fact that certain points of the parisb Agreement on ending the war between the US and Vietnam, were conraversial. This led Indonesia to pull out GARUDA VII from Saigon in April,27,1975 the annexation of South Vietnam by North Vietnam waas the reason for the first Asean Summit in Bali to stress again the urgency to preserve political stability in South east Asia.

(f) The ICCS Vietnam plaque of Garuda IV Mission in Vietnam (Memorabilia)

FEBRUARY 1974 NO INFO

March 1974

March,8th 1974. Trich Luc Bo Khai San Saigon Documenty with local Saigon minh thue revenue 1974 5 D and 10 D.


MORE INFORMATIONS AND COLLECTIONS LOOK AT DrIWANCYBERMUSEUM,PLEASE CLICK
hhtp://www.Driwancybermuseum.wordpress.com.
You will seen another collections like :
1.The President south vietman Nguyen van Thiue Stamp used on cover

2.The war pictures

the ned @ copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan Masterpiece Uniquecollection Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya koleksi unik masterpiece Dr Iwan)

SHOWCASE :

THE FAMOUS COMPOSER JOHAN STRAUSS MUSIC RECORD
(KOLEKSI PIRING HITAM KOMPOSER TERNAMA JOHAN STRAUSS JR)
FRAME ONE :
Dr IWAN COLLECTIONS
1. Dutch Phillips Recod , Johan Strauss Jr by The Vienna Philamormic Orchestra.
FRONT COVER

INSIDE COVER


On the 25th October 1824, the family of Johan and Anna Straus was blessed with the arrival of a son,who recieved the same name as his father. Another brother,Josef,followed two years later and at quite an early age both children showed undeniable traces of musical talent.
Their father,however,refused to allow them to follow the precarious profession of musician, and although their mother was also oposed in the beginning, she later secretly assited Johann to study music.
Struggling hard for many years against his father’s fame, giving lessons to earn his keep,coupled with the disappointment shown by his teacher,Drechsler,who wished to see Johann become a church musician, only served to strengthen his determination to establish his own orchestra.
The whole of Vienna naturally looked foward excitedly to the debut of Johhnn and his orchestra. Johann’s first appearance in public took place on the 15th,October,1844, and he took all Vienna in storm with two waltzes which he had composed for the occasion ,”Sinngedichte”, and “Gunstweber”
His passion for work never deserted him , and in addition tp 16 operettes, he wrote some 500 dances, including no less than 160 waltzes.
Posterity has has long since recognised the unique qualities of Johann Strauss, and has given him the title, as he was generally known those days in populer perlance, of “Johann Stauss, the King of the Waltz, and the uncrowned ruler the Empire of the Ballroom and the Dance”.
The “Blue Denube” has never been equalled as an example of descriptive music. The waves of the mighty river seem for rise and fall gently, the boatsman’s horn is heard in the distance, and the excited chirpings of the corncrakers and crikets fill the air with cheerful song. The fields,bathed in the sun, are enveloped in a deep silence. Then the Ship of Happiness appears, and, heavily loaded, it reveals itself as the bringer of everlasting joy, as the waltz fills teh air with its immortal beauty.
The “Tales from the Vienna Woods” portrays Nature’s awakening. A Soft call is heard and the boatsmen, loth to leave their beds,refuse to lend a willing ear. Wanderers,however, cannot be detrred in their unresttrained joy, and no one can still their happy song.
Then peace descends on the scene once again.
Mother Nature awakens but slowly, a hushed chirping ascends, and the first sounds of the bells are herad in the distance. Suddenly a lark rises, and a warbling melody ascends to the heavens. Once again the magical themes of the waltz are heard in all their glory.
And how exhalating is the waltz”Vienna Blood”!Joyful calls on the posthorn and the string impel those listening to join in the merry dance. The dancers burst out from the corners of every street, more and more of them, and ever more colour.
Soft notes and the flutes dominate the scene for a moment, and serve as an introduction to a queit country dance which the fills the air, rising to an almost painfully sweet climax. The reflects the unrestricted exuberance of the occasion and today,as the, the heart of every listeners and dancer bubbles over with exhilaration,whenever the exciting notes of this waltz titilate to their ear.
“Voice of Spring” is another description of Nature’s beauty,which in light,staccato style,cannot help conjuring up a picture of airy cobwebs,decked in dew,wafting in the warm Spring breezes.


An orchestra with an international reputation-The Vienna Symphony Orchestra.
When the conductor Carl Stix founded a small orchestra in Vienna in the Autumm of 1899, the “New Philharmonic Orchestra” as it was known at this time, no one realised that only one year later this new group would form the nucleus of an Orchestra of International fame-the Vienna Symphony Orchestra.
In 1907 , a second orchestra was founded, the “Wiener Tonkunstler orchestra”(the Vienna Misician’s Orchestra), led by Oskar Nedbal. This Orchestra experienced considerable financial difficulty,however,after the first world war,which led to the decision to amalgamet the two orchestras.
Since 1921/1922, this group of musicians has been kbnown as the”Vienna Symphony Orchestr was reorganised and expanded , notwithstanding the critical fianncial position,and this,in turn,led to founding of the Vienna Symphony Association. This was the dawn of the peruiod during which the orcestra began to take on the presnt form, and establish it international rep[utation.

The chief conductor and Director of the Vieanna State Opera, Professor Rudolf Moralt, comes from a promuinent family of musicians,born in Munich in 1902, a nephew of Richard Strauss.
Moralt even in his earlier years,showed a strong leaning towards the musical profession of his famous uncle.
As a musician on only 21 years, he rose from being repetiteur, to opera conductoed, and he was able,during the courase of subsequent years, to establish his reputation as a conductor at a number of operea House in Germany.
The Styrian Opera House in Grax(Austria) was,however,the first to recognise the organizibng talents of this great artist, and in 1937 he was engaged as Director of this opre.
From Graz, Professor Rudolf Moralt was xclaimed by Vienna, for the Vienna State Opera, and he has been there ever since.
Profesosr Moralt is one of the world’s specialist in the ralm of”Strauss” , and naturally,this isn’t confined to his uncle Richard Strauss, but to the whole dynasty of the Strauss family. This fact is exemplified once again in these four waltzes by Johann Strauss ,whose captivating melodies,magical harmonies and exciting rhythms,have been preserved in this recording by MOralt, in a way which will probably never equalled again by a second artist.
2.COLUMBIA, JOHANN STRAUS WALTZ BY VICTOR SILVESTER.ORCHESTRA

FRAME TWO:
THE BIOGRAPHY OF JOHAN STRAUSS JR.
Johann Strauss II

Johann Strauss IIJohann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Baptist Strauss or Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, or the Son (German: Sohn), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as “The Waltz King”, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.

Strauss was born in St. Ulrich (now a part of Neubau), the son of Johann Strauss I, another composer of dance music. His father did not wish him to become a composer, but rather a banker; however, the son defied his father’s wishes, and went on to study music with the composer Joseph Drechsler and the violin with Anton Kollmann, the ballet répétiteur of the Vienna Court Opera. Strauss had two younger brothers, Josef and Eduard Strauss, who became composers of light music as well, although they were never as well-known as their elder brother.

Some of Johann Strauss’s most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, and the Pizzicato Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the most well-known.

Contents
1 Early life
2 Debut as a composer
3 Career advancements
4 Marriages
5 Musical rivals and admirers
6 Stage works
7 Death and legacy
8 Portrayals in the media

Early life


Johann Strauss I, etching from 1835Strauss was born in St. Ulrich near Vienna (now a part of Neubau), Austria, on 25 October 1825, to the famous composer Johann Strauss I. His father did not want him to become a musician but rather a banker;[1] nevertheless, Strauss Junior studied the violin secretly as a child with the first violinist of his father’s orchestra, Franz Amon.[1] When his father discovered his son secretly practising on a violin one day, he gave him a severe whipping, saying that he was going to beat the music out of the boy.[2] It seems that rather than trying to avoid a Strauss rivalry, the elder Strauss only wanted his son to escape the rigors of a musician’s life.[3] It was only when the father abandoned his family for a mistress, Emilie Trampusch, that the son was able to concentrate fully on a career as a composer with the support of his mother.[4]

Strauss studied counterpoint and harmony with theorist Professor Joachim Hoffmann,[1] who owned a private music school. His talents were also recognized by composer Joseph Drechsler, who taught him exercises in harmony. His other violin teacher, Anton Kollmann, who was the ballet répétiteur of the Vienna Court Opera, also wrote excellent testimonials for him. Armed with these, he approached the Viennese authorities to apply for a license to perform.[5] He initially formed his small orchestra where he recruited his members at the Zur Stadt Belgrad tavern, where musicians seeking work could be hired easily.[6]

Debut as a composer


Johann Strauss in his younger yearsJohann Strauss I’s influence over the local entertainment establishments meant that many of them were wary of offering the younger Strauss a contract for fear of angering the father.[4] Strauss Jr. was able to persuade the Dommayer’s Casino in Hietzing, a suburb of Vienna, to allow him to perform.[7] The elder Strauss, in anger at his son’s disobedience, and at that of the proprietor, refused to ever play at the Dommayer’s Casino again,[8] which had been the site of many of his earlier triumphs.

Strauss made his debut at Dommayer’s in October 1844, where he performed some of his first works, such as the waltzes “Sinngedichte”, Op. 1 and “Gunstwerber”, Op. 4 and the polka “Herzenslust”, Op. 3.[1] Critics and the press were unanimous in their praise for Strauss’s music. A critic for Der Wanderer commented that “Strauss’s name will be worthily continued in his son; children and children’s children can look forward to the future, and three-quarter time will find a strong footing in him.”[1]

Despite the initial fanfare, Strauss found his early years as a composer difficult, but he soon won over audiences after accepting commissions to perform away from home. The first major appointment for the young composer was his award of the honorary position of “Kapellmeister of the 2nd Vienna Citizen’s Regiment”, which had been left vacant following Joseph Lanner’s death two years before.[9]

Vienna was racked by a bourgeois revolution on February 24, 1848, and the intense rivalry between father and son became much more apparent. Johann Jr. decided to side with the revolutionaries. It was a decision that was professionally disadvantageous, as the Austrian royalty twice denied him the much coveted ‘KK Hofballmusikdirektor’ position, which was first designated especially for Johann I in recognition of his musical contributions. Further, the younger Strauss was also arrested by the Viennese authorities for publicly playing the La Marseillaise, but was later acquitted.[10] The elder Strauss remained loyal to the monarchy, and composed his “Radetzky March”, Op. 228 (dedicated to the Habsburg field marshal Joseph Radetzky von Radetz), which would become one of his best-known compositions.[11]

When the elder Strauss died from scarlet fever in Vienna in 1849, the younger Strauss merged both their orchestras and engaged in further tours.[1] Later, he also composed a number of patriotic marches dedicated to the Habsburg Emperor Franz Josef I, such as the Kaiser Franz-Josef Marsch Op. 67 and the Kaiser Franz Josef Rettungs Jubel-Marsch Op. 126, probably to ingratiate himself in the eyes of the new monarch, who ascended to the Austrian throne after the 1848 revolution.[1]

Career advancements
Josef StraussStrauss Jr. eventually surpassed his father’s fame, and became one of the most popular of waltz composers of the era, extensively touring Austria–Hungary, Poland, and Germany with his orchestra. He applied for the KK Hofballmusikdirektor Music Director of the Royal Court Balls position, which he eventually attained in 1863,[1] after being denied several times before for his frequent brushes with the local authorities.

In 1853, due to constant mental and physical demands, Strauss suffered a nervous breakdown.[1] He took a seven-week vacation in the countryside in the summer of that year, on the advice of doctors. Johann’s younger brother Josef was persuaded by his family to abandon his career as an engineer and take command of Johann’s orchestra in the absence of the latter.[1]

In 1855, Strauss accepted commissions from the management of the Tsarskoye-Selo Railway Company of Saint Petersburg to play in Russia for the Vauxhall Pavilion at Pavlovsk in 1856. He would later return to perform in Russia for every year until 1865. [1]

Later, in the 1870s, Strauss and his orchestra toured the United States, where he took part in the Boston Festival at the invitation of bandmaster Patrick Gilmore and was the lead conductor in a ‘Monster Concert’ of over 1000 performers,[12] performing his “Blue Danube” waltz, amongst other pieces, to great acclaim.[12]

Marriages
Strauss married the singer Jetty Treffz in 1862, and they remained together until Jetty’s death in 1878.[1] Six weeks after her death,[1][13] Strauss married the actress Angelika Dittrich. Angelika was not a fervent supporter of his music, and their differences in status and opinion, and especially her indiscretion, led him to seek a divorce.[1]

Strauss was not granted a divorce by the Roman Catholic church, and therefore changed religion and nationality, and became a citizen of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha in January 1887.[1] Strauss sought solace in his third wife Adele Deutsch, whom he married in August 1882, and she encouraged the creative talent to flow once more in his later years, resulting in many famous compositions, such as the operettas Der Zigeunerbaron and Waldmeister, and the waltzes “Kaiser-Walzer” Op. 437, “Kaiser Jubiläum” Op. 434, and “Klug Gretelein” Op. 462.

Musical rivals and admirers
Johann Strauss and Johannes Brahms photographed in ViennaAlthough Strauss was the most sought-after composer of dance music in the latter half of the 19th century, stiff competition was present in the form of Karl Michael Ziehrer and Émile Waldteufel; the latter held a commanding position in Paris.[14] Phillip Fahrbach also denied the younger Strauss the commanding position of the KK Hofballmusikdirektor when the latter first applied for the post. The German operetta composer Jacques Offenbach, who made his name in Paris, also posed a challenge to Strauss in the operetta field.[15]

Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333.[16] Richard Strauss (unrelated to the Strauss family), when writing his Rosenkavalier waltzes, said in reference to Johann Strauss: “How could I forget the laughing genius of Vienna?”[17]

Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss, and to whom the latter dedicated his waltz “Seid umschlungen, Millionen!” (“Be Embraced, You Millions!”), Op. 443.[18] A story is told in biographies of both men that Strauss’s wife Adele approached Brahms with a customary request that he autograph her fan. It was usual for the composer to inscribe a few measures of his best-known music, and then sign his name. Brahms, however, inscribed a few measures from the “Blue Danube”, and then wrote beneath it: “Unfortunately, NOT by Johannes Brahms.”[19]

Stage works
Main article: List of operettas by Johann Strauss II
The most famous of Strauss’ operettas are Die Fledermaus, Eine Nacht in Venedig, and Der Zigeunerbaron. Notwithstanding their general lack of modern popularity, there are many dance pieces drawn from themes of his operettas, such as “Cagliostro-Walzer” Op. 370 (from Cagliostro in Wien), “O Schöner Mai” Walzer Op. 375 (from Prinz Methusalem), “Rosen aus dem Süden” Walzer Op. 388 (from Das Spitzentuch der Königin), and “Kuss-Walzer” op. 400 (from Der lustige Krieg), that have survived obscurity and become well-known. Strauss also wrote an opera, Ritter Pázmán, [20] and was in the middle of composing a ballet, Aschenbrödel, when he died in 1899.[21]

Death and legacy

A statue of the Waltz King in Stadtpark, ViennaStrauss was diagnosed with double pneumonia in the spring of 1899,[21] and died in Vienna, at the age of 73. He was buried in the Zentralfriedhof. At the time of his death, he was still composing his ballet Aschenbrödel.[21]

Strauss’s music is now regularly performed at the annual Neujahrskonzert of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, as a result of the efforts by Clemens Krauss who performed a special all-Strauss programme in 1929 with the Viennese orchestra. Many distinguished Strauss interpreters include Willi Boskovsky,[22] who carried on the “Vorgeiger” tradition of conducting with violin in hand, as is the Strauss family custom, as well as Herbert von Karajan and the opera conductor Riccardo Muti. In addition, the Wiener Johann Strauss Orchester, which was formed in 1966, pays tribute to the touring orchestras which once made the Strauss family so famous.[23]

Most of the Strauss works that are performed today may once have existed in a slightly different form, as Eduard Strauss destroyed much of the original Strauss orchestral archives in a furnace factory in Vienna’s Mariahilf district in 1907.[24] Eduard, then the only surviving brother of the three, took this drastic precaution after agreeing to a pact between himself and brother Josef that whoever outlived the other was to destroy their works. The measure was intended to prevent the Strauss family’s works from being claimed by another composer. This may also have been fueled by Strauss’s rivalry with another of Vienna’s popular waltz and march composers, Karl Michael Ziehrer.[25]

[edit] Portrayals in the mediaThe lives of the Strauss dynasty members and their world-renowned craft of composing Viennese waltzes are also briefly documented in several television adaptations, such as The Strauss Family (1972), The Strauss Dynasty (1991)[26] and Strauss, the King of 3/4 Time (1995).[27] Many other films used his works and melodies, and several films have been based upon the life of the musician, the most famous of which is called The Great Waltz (1938).[28] Alfred Hitchcock made a low-budget biopic of Strauss in 1933 called Waltzes from Vienna.[29] After a trip to Vienna, Walt Disney was inspired to create four feature films. One of those was The Waltz King, a loosely adapted biopic of Johann Strauss, which aired as part of the Wonderful World of Disney in the U.S. in 1963.[30] In Mikhail Bulgakov’s 1940 (published 1967) novel, The Master and Margarita, Johann Strauss conducts the orchestra during Satan’s Great Ball at the invitation of Behemoth.

the end @ copyright XDr Iwan suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan Masterpiece Uniquecollection Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya koleksi unik masterpiece Dr Iwan)

SHOWCASE :
THE TJILEDOEK HISTORIC COLLECTIONS(KOLEKSI SEJARAH KOTA CILEDUK)
FRAME ONE:
Dr IWAN COLLECTIONS
Postal Used cover from Tjiledoek with official Ducth Opziener E.H.Boschzwezen pre WWII


FRAME TWO:
INTERNATIONAL COLLECTIONS
A.Vintage Collections


B.RECENT COLLECTIONS
1.Ciledug Phrase in Indonesia laanguage(sanjak)
Ciledug

Ciledug….Ciledug…..
Jauhnya euuuuyy…..bikin mabug…
Nyampe di tempat..cuma dudug-dudug…
Nungguin tumjahe kerja…malah ngantug….

Ciledug….Ciledug…..
Jalanannya muacettt… jadi suntug…
Angkot plus Mikrolet… uuuhhh…blegug !!!!
2.Cileduk Road at Night

3.Cileduk Trading area


4.CILEDUK BINTARO REGENCY

5.CILEDUK BUS

6.CILEDUK RAILWAY STATION

7.CILEDUK NATIVE PEOPLE

FRAME THREE:
THE HISTORY OF CILEDUK CITY
CILEDUG

Ciledug, ialah salah satu kecamatan di wilayah kota Tangerang. Namun, terkadang wilayah sekitarnya, termasuk Pondok Aren, Serpong, Bintaro, Karang Tengah, biasa disebut Ciledug juga secara garis besar, dilihat dari kesamaan ciri geografis wilayah tersebut, berupa rawa-rawa atau kocolan. Ciledug sendiri terletak di 6° 19′ 45′ Lintang Selatan dan 106° 43′ 18” Bujur Timur.

Peta wilayah Ciledug
Berasal dari kata Bahasa Sunda, Ci = cai (air), dan Ledug = ngaledug (berkumpul, menggenang), dalam arti lain genangan air atau rawa-rawa (bog, swamp) yang mengendap. Memang, dahulu kala Ciledug identik dengan kawasan rawanya, hal inilah yang menjadikan air di Ciledug buruk mutunya . Ciledug, yang memiliki wilayah yang cukup besar dan luas, menghadapi masalah banjir akibat perumahan yang mulai marak di dasawarsa 90-an, sebagai bagian dari kota pinggiran (suburban) yang sedang berkembang dan menjadi pilihan murah untuk memiliki rumah, akibatnya tempat resapan air (reservoir), mulai berkurang, dan jika hujan tiba, datanglah banjir.

SITU GINTUNG CILEDUK
a.During Dutch East Indie

Tangerang District is location of the Situ Gintungreservoir built by Dutch colonial authorities in 1933. It was surrounded by a dam up to 16 metres (52 ft) high, which failed on 27 March 2009 with the resulting floods killing at least 93 people. The flood could have been prevented had local authorities not neglected the recommendation of American engineers which recommended the reinforcement of the dam and possible evacuation of the lower villages located at the very bottom of the dam

b.now
Pemkot Tangsel belum Tangani Kerusakan Situ Ciledug
Situ Ciledug—ANTARA/Muhammad Deffa/ip
TANGERANG–MICOM: Gugusan Alam Nalar Ekosistem Pemuda (Ganespa) Kota Tangerang Selatan, Banten, melaporkan kerusakan Situ Ciledug, Pamulang, ke penjabat wali kota.

“Ada enam kerusakan yang terjadi di Situ Ciledug sejak tiga tahun lalu dan belum mendapat perbaikan,” kata Ketua Genespa Tangerang Selatan Arizal Maulana di Tangerang, Minggu (21/11).

Kerusakan tersebut, kata dia, berupa keberadaan jaring dan keramba ikan yang berakibat pada proses sedimentasi dan pendangkalan. “Banyak sekali pemilik keramba ikan di situ sehingga menyebabkan kerusakan,” katanya.

Kemudian, kerusakan lainnya adalah pendangkalan situ yang berdampak pada kurangnya daya tampung air sebagai fungsi pengendali banjir. Pengerukan situ yang dilakukan oleh warga dengan maksud untuk memperluas lahan perkarangan mereka yang jaraknya berdekatan.

Bangunan permanen pada daerah bantaran dan garis sepada situ, kata dia, juga telah dilanggar oleh berbagai pihak sehingga merusak tatanan situ sendiri. Pembuangan sampah juga dilakukan oleh warga sekitar situ dan pencemaran air situ akibat pembuangan limbah cair oleh pengusaha di bantaran situ, lanjut dia.

THE END @ copyright Dr Iwan Suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan Masterpiece Uniquecollection Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya koleksi unik masterpiece Dr Iwan)

SHOWCASE :
THE TYPE OF DAI NIPPON MILITARY COLLECTIONS(JENIS KOLEKSI BALATENTARA DAI NIPPON)

FRAME ONE:
INTRODUCTIONS

THIS ARTICLES DEDICATED TO THE DAI NIPPON MILITARY FAMILY WHICH NOW THEY HAD THE SECOND DISASTER EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI, I PRAY TO THE HOLLY GOD , FOR HIS HOLLY MERCY TO THEM AND STILL STRONG TO ACCEPETED THIS SECOND DISASTER, WHAT MORE WORST THE WW II WAR DISASTER OR THE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI DISASTER, I THINK THE WWII DISASTER MORE WORST BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL NUCLEAR WEAPONS WHICH MADE MORE MUCH DISASTER TO THE HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI PEOPLE, ALSO TO THE SOLDIER IN THE FIELDS.

THE MEMORIABLE UNIQUE COLLECTIONS OF DAI NIPPON ARMY COLLECTIONS WERE COLLECTED NOT ONLY BY THE JAPANESE PEOPLE, BUT ALSO TO THE PEOPLE WHO LIVED AT THE WAR AREA AND THE FAMILY OF THE SOLDIER WHO JOINED THE PASIFIC WW II WAR.

MANY TYPES OF THE MEMORABLE DAI NIPPON COLLECTIONS I HAVE EXHIBITED IN MY CYBERMUSEUM LIKE:
POSTAL HISTORY, REVENUE HISTORY,NUMISMATIC, HANDGUN, THOUSAND STICH BELT(SENNIBERRI), DAI NIPPON PROPAGANDA

I HOPE THE COLLECTORS AFTER THIS WILL STARTING TO HUNTING THIS VERY RARE COLLECTIONS WHICH BECAME MORE DIFFICULT TO FOUND NOW.

I WILL SHOW THE SAMPLE OF THE RARE UNIQUE DAI NIPPON MEMORIABLE COLLECTIONS, IF SOME ONE HAVE THE SAME COLLECTIONS PLEASE SHOW US VIA COMMENT,THANKS
Greatings From the Cybermuseum Blog
Dr iwan Suwandy

FRAME TWO:
THE VERY RARE DAI NIPPON POSTAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS



FRAME THREE:
THE VERY RARE DAINIPPON REVENUE TAX HISTORY COLLECTIONS


FRAME FOUR:
THE VERY RARE DAI NIPPON HANDGUN COLLCTIONS


FRAME FIVE:
THE VERY RARE DAI NIPPON MEDAL COLLECTIONS

FRAME SIX:
THE VERY RARE DAI NIPPON THOUSAND STICTCH BELT COLLECTIONS


FRAME SEVEN :
THE VERY RARE DAI NIPPON DOCUMENT AND PICTURE MEMORIABLE COLLECTIONS
1.THE DOCUMENT OF DAI NIPPON RENT THE CAR

2. THE DAINIPPON MILITARY LISCENCE TO PRIN A BOOK

3.THE RARE DAI NIPPON PICTURES IN INDONESIA
(1)THE DAI NIPPON OFFICER COL NAKAYAMA AND THE KING OF SOLO MANGKOENEGARAAN AT JAKARTA RAILWAY STATION

(2) tHE vIETNAM FOREIGN MENISTRY CAME TO INDONESIA AT kEMAYORAN AIRPORT

FRAME NINE:
THE VERY RARE DAINIPPON PROPAGANDA COLLECTIONS

the end @ copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan Masterpiece Uniquecollection Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya koleksi unik masterpiece Dr Iwan)

SHOWCASE :
THE RARE MILITARY DAI NIPPON OCCUPATION JAVA PROPAGANDA ILLUSTARTIONS

FRAME ONE:
THE SCHOOL’S BOOK PROPAGANDA









FRAME TWO
THE NEWSPAPER ILLUSTARTION PROPAGANDA




FRAME THREE
THE LAW ENFORCEMENT AND PICTURE POSTCARD PROPAGANDA

FRAME FOUR
THE DAI NIPPON OCCUPATION PROPAGANDA

THE NANKING MASSACRE – two films to remind us

Why do I do this to myself? First I watch two intensely depressing dramatic recreations of war atrocities, intense enough to haunt me for days. Then I decide to review them, challenging my love of Japan with these accounts of atrocious conduct by their armed forces.

In 1937, when Japan was invading China, its armies conquered the (then) capital city of Nanking. The Japanese army then began killing the prisoners of war, then the civilians, to strike a psychological blow to the rest of China. Knowing full well that they were breaking international conventions of war, they disguised the massacre from the rest of the world.

These are two very different films about the siege, serving two audiences: one is obviously intended for ‘international cinema’, the other (possibly unintentionally) is ‘exploitation’.

Though they’re tough viewing, knowing that these events actually happened, I wanted to learn more about the depths that the Japanese army sank to. While I admire Japanese culture, pop and otherwise, I’ve mainly been learning about their history from their viewpoint. But after visiting several of Japan’s neighbouring countries and reading their news sites, I became increasingly aware of ‘old wounds’ and lasting hostilities.

While the US and Europe are hyper-conscious of the history of Nazi Germany, we mainly remember wartime Japan for Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. In China, Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines, Japan was regarded the same way we saw Germany. Indeed, the scale of Japanese war crimes and the variety of atrocities rivals Nazi Germany.

So I’m having trouble joining the dots between their peace-loving society of today and the extremes of their wartime mindset. How can a country change so quickly and so completely? I guess the answer is closer to home – my own country has much to answer for in it’s conduct abroad, both recently and historically.

I’m not going to boycott Japanese culture for the crimes of the past, but I’m not going to ignore history either. When I first heard of the ‘Rape of Nanking’, I naively assumed it happened centuries ago in more barbaric times. To find that it was only last century showed up a large gap in my historical knowledge.

BLACK SUN: THE NANKING MASSACRE,
MEN BEHIND THE SUN 4
(1994, Hong Kong, Hei tai yang: Nan Jing da tu sha)

Relentless glory propaganda

This is a weird film that would need much more research to determine what the film-makers were trying to do, if I was at all impressed by it. The director, T F Mou, denies it’s an exploitation film, and the size of the budget seems to lift the project out of that genre. But it’s an endless diary of gory re-enactments of war atrocities, with little story or drama, and a near absence of continuing characters. The Japanese soldiers storm around the city, killing and raping. The commanders take pleasure in trying out various methods of execution, from machine-gun to samurai sword.

It looks like a wartime propaganda film, but it was made 1994. I’m almost guessing it was intended to pressure the Japanese government on outstanding issues – maybe compensation, apologies, selective history books? The other likely result was to incite outrage amongst Chinese audiences.

Compare this blunt approach to any modern American movie about the Nazis. One moment in Black Sun made me remember a silent movie where Eric Von Stroheim throws a baby out of a high window. The scene looked comical: a swift but lazy cinematic shorthand to make you hate the character in seconds, and tell you what to think about all German commanders.

While City of Life and Death shows only one Japanese leader orchestrating the destruction of the city, Black Sun takes pains to name and shame many different commanders and their personal roles in the killing. This is perhaps another clue to the movie’s intentions.

After a while, the many shock moments reminded me of the climax to Soldier Blue, but in contrast with it’s involving characters, storyline and complex portrayal of the invaders as well as the invaded (Soldier Blue himself is shocked by his own sides’ misconduct). The Japanese soldiers of Black Sun are portrayed with a uniform hive mentality. It also doesn’t help that the Japanese soldiers all look very Chinese. Only the commanders look as if they’re played by Japanese actors. Lazily and inaccurately, the soldiers of both sides talk in Chinese.

I expected this to be far more cheaply made than it is. It looks largely authentic, uses a lot of extras and some extensive locations. The most spectacular scene illustrates how the Japanese burned the bodies of civilians before dumping them in the river. They could then claim that they’d only killed soldiers. The scale of the fire of hundreds of bodies along a riverbank rivals the inferno at the end of Apocalypse Now.

But if there’s any doubt that what we’re being shown happened, the catalogue of atrocities is verified onscreen, by cross-cutting with actual photographs and filmed footage. The power and importance of these images was not lost on the Japanese army who made every effort to destroy any incriminating material that left Nanking at the time, and they burnt any such evidence of their own when the war was lost.

There’s no doubt that all this and worse actually happened, but without any emotional involvement and a clumsy, one-sided approach, it’s a far less powerful and informative film than it should have been.

I watched the US region 1 DVD, which fills in much of the historical context with an informative old documentary episode of Frank Capra’s Why We Fight as a DVD extra.

In the UK, it’s purely been sold as exploitation, check out the crass DVD cover, which somehow borders on comedy, using a poorly staged publicity shot of one of the film’s most infamous scenes. Contrast that with the US DVD cover that uses an actual archive photograph.

This is actually the fourth in a series of films, called Men Behind the Sun, which I won’t be investigating any further. The first film in the series has an important subject, the horrifying human experiments of Camp 731, but the inclusion of animal cruelty and mondo footage (using an actual corpse for one scene) means I’ll avoid it. However, the story of Camp 731 has one hell of conspiracy storyline and I’d like to learn more about it.

Black Sun is a bizarre experience – as it abandons so many movie conventions – that it’s fairly silly to compare it to the professionally and artfully produced City of Life and Death. But I have.

CITY OF LIFE AND DEATH
(2009, China/Hong Kong, Nanjing! Nanjing!)

An involving man-made disaster

This major new film, shot in black and white, is still being premiered round the world. It’s also about the Nanking during the Japanese siege.

While Black Sun throws out plenty of factual context in captions and voiceovers, this has no such introduction and relies on small badly-written postcards to set up a little historical background. Black Sun also portrayed the Chinese, soldiers and civilians alike, as totally defeated. This begins with the army still defending itself, albeit with guerrilla tactics. It also sets up storylines with soldiers from both armies, one Japanese soldier being just as traumatised.

The success of the film is the emotional involvement with the characters, focussing on the family of the Chinese translator to John Rabe – a German envoy famous for his attempts to protect the civilians against impossible odds.

Unlike Black Sun, if anyone gets hurt, raped, slaughtered, the impact is devastating. There’s a dreadful scene that’s basically a point of view experience of being herded into a mass slaughter.


After the threat of counterforce has been systematically eradicated, the invading army are rewarded with ‘comfort women’, Japanese prostitutes rationed out to the soldiers. But as the siege wears on, the supply of women starts taking Chinese ‘volunteers’. The widescale use of civilian women for sex lends an awful, literal meaning to ‘the rape of Nanking’.

While the Japanese use of unnecessary force was meant to terrify the rest of China, it instead unified the regions of the massive country into an unbeatable foe.

The inclusion of a sympathetic portrayal of a Japanese soldier has drawn criticism from Chinese critics, complaining that the tone of the film wasn’t harsh enough on the Japanese. Perhaps they would have preferred a less-sensitive, less balanced film, like Black Sun perhaps?


I’d recommend City of Life and Death as a beautifully made and observed film on a harrowing subject.

It had a limited cinema release in the UK and there’ll be a DVD and Blu-Ray release in August. I watched a Chinese DVD, which may be slightly censored (missing some violence). The subtitles didn’t translate all the onscreen signs and nameplates.

The excellent WildGrounds site has an article comparing City of Life and Death to actual (and upsetting) photos from the siege.

FRAME FIVE :
THE HISTORY OF DAI NIPPON OCCUPATION INDONESIA
1. Background
Until 1942, Indonesia was colonised by the Netherlands and was known as the Netherlands East Indies. In 1929, during the Indonesian National Awakening, Indonesian nationalists leaders Sukarno and Mohammad Hatta (later founding President and Vice President), foresaw a Pacific War and that a Japanese advance on Indonesia might be advantageous for the independence cause. [2]

The Japanese spread the word that they were the ‘Light of Asia’. Japan was the only Asian nation that had successfully transformed itself into a modern technological society at the end of the nineteenth century and it remained independent when most Asian countries had been under European or American power, and had beaten a European power, Russia, in war. [3] Following its military campaign in China Japan turned its attention to Southeast Asia advocating to other Asians a ‘Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere’, which they described as a type of trade zone under Japanese leadership. The Japanese had gradually spread their influence through Asia in the first half of the twentieth century and during the 1920s and 1930s had established business links in the Indies. These ranged from small town barbers, photographic studios and salesmen, to large department stores and firms such as Suzuki and Mitsubishi becoming involved in the sugar trade. [4] The Japanese population peaked in 1931, with 6,949 residents before starting a gradual decrease, largely due to economic tensions between Japan and the Netherlands Indies government. [5] Japanese aggression in Manchuria and China in the late 1930s caused anxiety amongst the Chinese in Indonesia who set up funds to support the anti-Japanese effort. Dutch intelligence services also monitored Japanese living in Indonesia. [6] A number of Japanese had been sent by their government to establish links with Indonesian nationalists, particularly with Muslim parties, while Indonesian nationalists were sponsored to visit Japan. Such encouragement of Indonesian nationalism was part of a broader Japanese plan for an ‘Asia for the Asians’. [7]

In November 1941, Madjlis Rakjat Indonesia, an Indonesian organization of religious, political and trade union groups, submitted a memorandum to the Dutch East Indies Government requesting the mobilization of the Indonesian people in the face of the war threat. [8] The memorandum was refused because the Government did not consider the Madjlis Rakyat Indonesia to be representative of the people. Within only four months, the Japanese had occupied the archipelago.

2. The Invasion
Main article: Netherlands East Indies campaign

Japanese advance through Indonesia, 1942
On December 8, 1941, Netherlands declared war on Japan. [9] In January the American-British-Dutch-Australian Command (ABDACOM) was formed to co-ordinate Allied forces in South East Asia. On the night of January 10-11, 1942, the Japanese attacked Menado in Sulawesi. At about the same moment they attacked Tarakan, a major oil extraction centre and port in the north east of Borneo. On February 27, the Allied fleet was defeated in the Battle of the Java Sea. From February 28 to March 1, 1942, Japanese troops landed on four places along the northern coast of Java almost undisturbed. On March 8, the Allied forces in Indonesia surrendered. The colonial army was consigned to detention camps and Indonesian soldiers were released. European civilians were interned once Japanese or Indonesian replacements could be found for senior and technical positions. [10]

Outline of the Japanese entry in Batavia, as imagined by the Japanese
Liberation from the Dutch was initially greeted with optimistic enthusiasm by Indonesians who came to meet the Japanese army waving flags and shouting support such as “Japan is our older brother” and “banzai Dai Nippon”.

The Indonesians abandoned their colonial masters in droves and openly welcomed the Japanese as liberators. As the Japanese advanced, rebellious Indonesians in virtually every part of the archipelago killed small groups of Europeans (particularly the Dutch) and informed the Japanese reliably on the whereabouts of larger groups [11]
In Aceh, the local population rebelled against the Dutch colonial authorities, even before the arrival of the Japanese. As renowned Indonesian writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer noted:
With the arrival of the Japanese just about everyone was full of hope, except for those who had worked in the service of the Dutch. [12]
3. The occupation

Indonesia under the Japanese occupation [13]
Initially Japanese occupation was welcomed by the Indonesians as liberators. [14] During the occupation, the Indonesian nationalist movement increased in popularity. In July 1942, leading nationalists like Sukarno accepted Japan’s offer to rally the public in support of the Japanese war effort. Both Sukarno and Mohammad Hatta were decorated by the Emperor of Japan in 1943.

Japanese rulers divided Indonesia into three regions; Sumatra was placed under the 25th Army, Java and Madura were under the 16th Army, while Borneo and eastern Indonesia were controlled by the Navy 2nd South Fleet. The 16th and 25th Army were headquartered in Singapore [1] and also controlled Malaya until April 1943, when its command was narrowed to just Sumatra and the headquarters moved to Bukittinggi. The 16th Army was headquartered in Jakarta, while the 2nd South Fleet was headquartered in Makassar.

Internment camp in Jakarta, c. 1945
Experience of the Japanese occupation of Indonesia varied considerably, depending upon where one lived and one’s social position. Many who lived in areas considered important to the war effort experienced torture, sex slavery, arbitrary arrest and execution, and other war crimes. Many thousands of people were taken away from Indonesia as unfree labour (romusha) for Japanese military projects, including the Burma-Siam Railway, and suffered or died as a result of ill-treatment and starvation. People of Dutch and mixed Dutch-Indonesian descent were particular targets of the Japanese occupation and were interned.

During the World War II occupation, tens of thousands of Indonesians were to starve, work as slave labourers, or be forced from their homes. In the National Revolution that followed, tens, even hundreds, of thousands (including civilians), would die in fighting against the Japanese, Allied forces, and other Indonesians, before Independence was achieved. [15] A later United Nations report stated that four million people died in Indonesia as a result of famine and forced labor during the Japanese occupation, including 30,000 European civilian internee deaths. [16]

Netherlands Indian roepiah – the Japanese occupation currency
Materially, whole railway lines, railway rolling stock, and industrial plants in Java were appropriated and shipped back to Japan and Manchuria. British intelligence reports during the occupation noted significant removals of any materials that could be used in the war effort.

The only prominent opposition politician was leftist Amir Sjarifuddin who was given 25,000 guilders by the Dutch in early 1942 to organise an underground resistance through his Marxist and nationalist connections. The Japanese arrested Amir in 1943, and he only escaped execution following intervention from Sukarno, whose popularity in Indonesia and hence importance to the war effort was recognised by the Japanese. Apart from Amir’s Surabaya-based group, the most active pro-Allied activities were among the Chinese, Ambonese, and Menadonese. [17]

3. 1. Indonesian nationalism

Young Indonesian boys being trained by the Japanese Army
During the occupation, the Japanese encouraged and backed Indonesian nationalistic feeling, created new Indonesian institutions, and promoted nationalist leaders such as Sukarno. In the decades before the war, the Dutch had been overwhelmingly successful in suppressing the small nationalist movement in Indonesia such that the Japanese proved fundamental for coming Indonesian independence. [15]

The Japanese regime perceived Java as the most politically sophisticated but economically the least important area; its people were Japan’s main resource. As such—and in contrast to Dutch suppression—the Japanese encouraged Indonesian nationalism in Java and thus increased its political sophistication (similar encouragement of nationalism in strategic resource-rich Sumatra came later, but only after it was clear the Japanese would lose the war). The outer islands under naval control, however, were regarded as politically backward but economically vital for the Japanese war effort, and these regions were governed the most oppressively of all. These experiences and subsequent differences in nationalistic politicisation would have profound impacts on the course of the Indonesian Revolution in the years immediately following independence (1945-1950).

In addition to new-found Indonesian nationalism, equally important for the coming independence struggle and internal revolution was the Japanese orchestrated economic, political and social dismantling and destruction of the Dutch colonial state. [15]

4. End of the occupation

Japanese commanders listening to the terms of surrender
General MacArthur had wanted to fight his way with Allied troops to liberate Java in 1944-45 but was ordered not to by the joint chiefs and President Roosevelt. The Japanese occupation thus officially ended with Japanese surrender in the Pacific and two days later Sukarno declared Indonesian Independence. However Indonesian forces would have to spend the next four years fighting the Dutch for its independence. American restraint from fighting their way into Java certainly saved many Japanese, Javanese, Dutch and American lives. On the other hand, Indonesian independence would have likely been achieved more swiftly and smoothly had MacArthur had his way and American troops occupied Java. [18]

Liberation of the internment camps holding western prisoners was not swift. Sukarno, who had Japanese political sponsorship starting in 1929 and continuing into Japanese occupation, convinced his countrymen that these prisoners were a threat to Indonesia’s independence movement. Largely because they were political bargaining chips with which to deal with the colonizer, but also largely to humiliate them; Sukarno forced Westerners back into Japanese concentration camps, still run by armed Japanese soldiers. While there certainly was enough labor to garrison these camps with Indonesian soldiers, Sukarno chose to allow his former ally to maintain authority. Conditions were better during post war internment than under previous internment, this time Red Cross supplies were made available and the Allies made the Japanese order the most heinous and cruel occupiers home. After four months of post war internment Western internees were released on the condition they leave Indonesia.

Most of the Japanese military personnel and civilian colonial administrators were repatriated to Japan following the war, except for several hundred who were detained for investigations into war crimes, for which some were later put on trial. About 1,000 Japanese soldiers deserted from their units and assimilated into local communities. Many of these soldiers provided assistance to rebel forces during the Indonesian National Revolution. [19]

Japanese soldiers on trial.
The first stages of warfare were initiated in October 1945 when, in accordance with the terms of their surrender, the Japanese tried to re-establish the authority they relinquished to Indonesians in the towns and cities. Japanese military police killed Republican pemuda in Pekalongan (Central Java) on 3 October, and Japanese troops drove Republican pemuda out of Bandung in West Java and handed the city to the British, but the fiercest fighting involving the Japanese was in Semarang. On 14 October, British forces began to occupy the city. Retreating Republican forces retaliated by killing between 130 and 300 Japanese prisoners they were holding. Five hundred Japanese and 2000 Indonesians had been killed and the Japanese had almost captured the city six days later when British forces arrived. [20]

I of course knew that we had been forced to keep Japanese troops under arms to protect our lines of communication and vital areas…but it was nevertheless a great shock to me to find over a thousand Japanese troops guarding the nine miles of road from the airport to the town. [21]
– Lord Mountbatten of Burma in April 1946 after visiting Sumatra, referring to the use of Japanese Surrendered Personnel.

Until 1949, the returning Dutch authorities held 448 war crimes trials against 1038 suspects. 969 of those were condemned (93.4%) with 236 (24.4%) receiving a death sentence

the end @ copyright dr Iwan Suwandy 2011

MUSEUM DUNIA MAYA PERTAMA DI INDONESIA

DALAM PROSES UNTUK MENDAPATKAN SERTIFIKAT MURI

PENDIRI DAN PENEMU IDE

THE FOUNDER

Dr IWAN SUWANDY, MHA

WELCOME TO THE MAIN HALL OF FREEDOM

SELAMAT DATANG DI GEDUNG UTAMA “MERDEKA

Showroom :
The Driwan Masterpiece Uniquecollection Cybermuseum

(Museum Duniamaya koleksi unik masterpiece Dr Iwan)

SHOWCASE :
THE RARE SURABAIA cITY MEMORABLE COLLECTION(KOLEKSI LANGKA PERINGATAN KOTA SURABAYA)
THE CITY EMBLEM OF SURA AND BUAYA
INTRODUCTION:
THIS ARTICLES DEDICATED TO THE SURABAYA CITY 718 YEARS ANNIVERSARY IN mAY,31TH 2011 , READ THE ARTICLES IN INDONESIAN LANGUAGE

Ulang Tahun Kota Surabaya ke 718

tanggal 31 Mei 2011 merupakan ulang tahun yang ke 715 KOTA surabaya. tentu kita masih ingat tiga tahun yang lalu 2008, telah diadakan Sebuah pagelaran musik yang bertema “Sparkling LA LIGHT Music 2008” akan menyemarakkan acara ulang tahun kota Surabaya dengan menampilkan DUO MAIA, PADI, YOVIE & THE NUNO, bertempat di halaman taman Surya. Bagaimanakah tahun ini ,apakah akan diadakan pergelaran musik , pasti akan diadakan ,harap info dari pengemar musik kota Buaya.

FRAME ONE:
Dr IWAN COLLECTION
1.The Postal History Of Surabaya in 19 the century
. Small round date stamped from Sitoebondo 13.7.1887 to Soerabaia cds 14.7.1887 on DEI Willem II green Postal stationer

2. SURABAIA ANNIVERSARY YEAR(YAARMARKT-ULANGTAHUN) DURING DEI(HINDIA BELANDA)

HEADSIDE

TAILSIDE

3. SURABIA CHRISTIANS MIDDLE SCHOOL DURING DEI(NED.INDIE CHRISETRIJKLE MULO)

4.Dai nippon occupation surabaia
1)The last Dutch Marine document after DEI capitulation Indonesia in April 1942

2)The last DEI Telephon Billing at Surabaia, 1 april 1942 after capitulation March 8 1942

5.SURABAIA INFERNO PICTURES
1)Bung Karno And Bung Hatta arrive at airpot

2)Bung Karno and bung Hatta out of car

3)Bung Karno and Bung Hatta with British Armed Forces general

3)Gen.Mallay broken Car

6..AGUNG BAR AND RESTAURANT AMUSEMENT TOKEN SURABAJA(TOKEN JUDI BAR DAN RESTO AGUNG)
HEADSIDE

TAILSIDE

FRAME TWO:
THE HISTORY OF SURABAIA CITY

Surabaya
Suroboyo

Downtown Surabaya

Seal

Motto: Sparkling Surabaya

SurabayaLocation of Surabaya in Indonesia
Coordinates: 7°15′55″S 112°44′33″E / 7.26528°S 112.7425°E / -7.26528; 112.7425Coordinates: 7°15′55″S 112°44′33″E / 7.26528°S 112.7425°E / -7.26528; 112.7425
Country Indonesia
Province East Java
Settled May 31, 1293
Government
– Mayor Tri Rismaharini
Area
– City 374.78 km2 (144.7 sq mi)
– Metro 1,805.08 km2 (696.9 sq mi)
Elevation 5 m (16 ft)
Population (2010 Indonesia Census)
– City 2,765,908
– Density 7,380.1/km2 (19,114.3/sq mi)
– Metro 5,622,259
– Metro density 3,114.7/km2 (8,067/sq mi)
Time zone WIB (UTC+7)
Website surabaya.go.id

Surabaya (pronounced [surəˈbaja]) (formerly Soerabaja) is Indonesia’s second-largest city with a population of over 2.7 million (5.6 million in the metropolitan area), and the capital of the province of East Java. It is located on the northern shore of eastern Java at the mouth of the Mas River and along the edge of the Madura Strait.

To Indonesians, it is known as “the city of heroes” due to the importance of the Battle of Surabaya in galvanising Indonesian and international support for Indonesian independence during the Indonesian National Revolution.

Contents
1 Etymology
2 History
3 The City
4 Climate
5 Transport
6 Economy
7 Demographics
7.1 Ethnicity
7.2 Language
7.3 Time
7.4 Religion
8 Dolly
9 Education
10 Pictures Gallery

Etymology
Statue of the shark and crocodile in the city’s legend

Surabaya is locally believed to derive its name from the words sura or suro (shark) and baya or boyo (crocodile), two creatures which, in a local myth, fought each other in order to gain the title of “the strongest and most powerful animal” in the area according to a Jayabaya prophecy. This prophecy tells of a fight between a giant white shark and a giant white crocodile. Now the two animals are used as the city’s logo, the two facing each other while circling, as depicted in a statue appropriately located near the entrance to the city zoo. This folk etymology, though embraced enthusiastically by city leaders, is unverifiable.

Alternate derivations proliferate: from the Javanese sura ing baya, meaning “bravely facing danger”; or from the use of surya to refer to the sun. Some people consider this Jayabaya prophecy as a great war between Surabaya native people and invaders in 1945, while another story is about two heroes that fought each other in order to be the king of the city. The two heroes were Sura and Baya.

History

Map of Surabaya from an 1897 English travel guideThe earliest record of Surabaya was in a 1225 book written by Chau Ju-Kua, in which it was called Jung-ya-lu,[1] the ancient name of Surabaya. Ma Huan documented the early fifteen-century visit of Zheng He’s Treasure ship in his 1433 book Ying-yai Sheng-lan: “after travelling south for more than twenty li, the ship reached Sulumayi, whose foreign name is Surabaya. At the estuary, the outflowing water is fresh.”[2]

In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Surabaya was a sultanate and a major political and military power in eastern Java. It entered a conflict with, and was later captured by, the more powerful Sultanate of Mataram in 1625 under Sultan Agung. It was one of Mataram’s fiercest campaigns, in which they had to conquer Surabaya’s allies, Sukadana and Madura and to lay siege to the city before capturing it. With this conquest, Mataram then controlled almost the whole of Java, with the exception of the Sultanate of Banten and the Dutch settlement of Batavia.

Riverside scenery in Surabaya at the end of the 19th century


Handelstraat, Surabaya in 1930s, now Jembatan Merah area.The expanding East Indies Companies took the city over from a weakened Mataram in November 1743. Surabaya became a major trading center under the Dutch colonial government, and hosted the largest naval base in the colony. In 1917 a revolt occurred amongst the soldiers and sailors of Surabaya, led by the Indies Social Democratic Association. The revolt was firmly crushed and the insurgents given harsh sentences.

Japan occupied the city in 1942 as part of the occupation of Indonesia, and it was bombed by the Allies in 1944. After that it was seized by Indonesian nationalists. However, the young nation was soon put into conflict with the British who were care takers of the Dutch colony after the surrender of the Japanese.

The Battle of Surabaya was one of the most important battles of the Indonesian revolution. It was started after British Brigadier Mallaby was killed on October 30, 1945 near Jembatan Merah (the “Red Bridge”), allegedly by a stray bullet. The Allies gave an ultimatum to the Indonesian freedom fighters inside the city to surrender, but this was refused. The ensuing battle, which took thousands of lives, took place on 10 November, and is nowadays celebrated as Heroes’ Day (Hari Pahlawan). The incident of the red-white flag (the Dutch national red-white-and-blue flag at the top of Yamato Hotel’s tower that was torn into the Indonesian red-white flag) by Bung Tomo is also recorded as a heroic feat during the struggle of this city.

The CityAs the main seaport and commercial center in the eastern region of Indonesia, Surabaya has become one of the largest cities in Southeast Asia. Today, Surabaya’s population is around three million, and the surrounding rural area houses at least 7 million. The areas surrounding Surabaya include Lamongan to the northwest, Gresik to the west, Bangkalan to the northeast, Sidoarjo to the south, and Mojokerto and Jombang to the southwest.

On Wednesday, 10 June 2009 the Suramadu Bridge between Surabaya and the island of Madura; was completed and it is currently the longest bridge in the country. Madura can also be accessed by a ferry service that operates regularly from Surabaya’s port, Tanjung Perak (which literally means: “Silver Cape” in Indonesian).

The Adhiwangsa, Taman Beverly, and Water Place Residences are three of the tallest skyscrapers in Surabaya.


Plaza Tunjungan, Galaxy Mall, Surabaya Plaza, Supermal Pakuwon Indah, Hi-Tech Mall, Surabaya Town Square, and Royal Plaza Surabaya are the famous shopping centres in Surabaya. Surabaya is home to the Eastern Armada, one of two in the Indonesian Navy. Its strong maritime heritage is also reflected with the Submarine Monument, a real retired Russian submarine, called Pasopati, that was converted into a museum ship in the city centre. Flooding is common in many areas of the city during the rainy season, mostly caused by clogged sewers and inept bureaucracy. The fact that Surabaya is located in a river delta and has a flat and relatively low elevation doesn’t help the matter either.

Surabaya is the location of the only synagogue in Indonesia, but it rarely obtains a minyan. There is also a Jewish cemetery in the city.[3][4]

Surabaya’s zoo, opened in 1916, was the first in the world to have successfully bred orangutans in captivity.


Cheng Hoo Mosque, SurabayaOther points of interest include:

Grand Mosque of Surabaya, the largest mosque in East Java.
Cheng Ho Mosque, the first mosque in Indonesia built with Chinese-style architecture
Jales Veva Jaya Mahe Monument, a large, admiral-like statue which commemorates the Indonesian Navy.
Mpu Tantular Museum, has a large collection of ancient Javanese artifacts.
Monkasel, abbreviated from Monumen Kapal Selam (English: Submarine Monument) [1]
A Soviet-built submarine display (named KRI Pasopati (410)), which proudly served in Indonesian Navy since 1962. Launched in 1952 and since her decommisioning in 1990, now preserved as a monument. It is open as tourism attraction. The body/hull was slightly cut for stairs & door for easier public entrance & viewing. Right beside the monument there is a building where a short movie about the history of the submarine itself can be watched.
Bonbin Surabaya is one of the famous zoos in Southeast Asia
Heroic Monument is the main symbol and one of the attractive tourist destinations in Surabaya and Southeast Asia
House of Sampoerna is a cigarette museum, and also one of the factory of Sampoerna brand cigarette. It also provides a City Sightseeing bus for free (Surabaya Heritage Track) which operates daily with the particular schedule. It also provides an English tour guide for the sightseeing.
Surabaya has 31 subdistricts. They are: Genteng, Bubutan, Tegalsari, Simokerto, Tambaksari, Gubeng, Krembangan, Semampir, Pabean Cantikan, Wonokromo, Sawahan, Tandes, Karang Pilang, Wonocolo, Rungkut, Sukolilo, Kenjeran, Benowo, Lakarsantri, Mulyorejo, Tenggilis Mejoyo, Gunung Anyar, Jambangan, Gayungan, Wiyung, Dukuh Pakis, Asem Rowo, Sukomanunggal, Bulak, Pakal and Sambikerep.[5]

Surabaya has two huge townships developed by 2 famous developers. In West Surabaya, it has Citraland by Ciputra Group. Citraland is for its G-Walk, a spot for dining out, Ciputra Water Park, and University of Ciputra. In East Surabaya it has Pakuwon City by Pakuwon Group. Pakuwon City has its own dining out spot, called Food Festival, and it is developing more facilities, such as Pakuwon Town Square. Surabaya consists of 163 villages.[5]

Climate
Surabaya features a tropical wet and dry climate, with distinct wet and dry seasons. The city’s wet season runs from November through May, while the dry season covers the remaining five months. Unlike a number of cities and regions with a tropical wet and dry climate, average high and low temperatures are very consistent throughout the course of the year, with an average high temperature of around 31 degrees Celsius and average low temperatures of around 26 degrees Celsius. Surabaya on average sees approximately 1500 mm of precipitation annually.

Climate data for Surabaya
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 30
(86) 30
(86) 30.6
(87) 31.1
(88) 31.1
(88) 30.6
(87) 30.6
(87) 31.1
(88) 31.7
(89) 32.8
(91) 32.2
(90) 31.1
(88) 31.1
(88)
Average low °C (°F) 25
(77) 25
(77) 25
(77) 26.1
(79) 26.1
(79) 25
(77) 24.4
(76) 25
(77) 25
(77) 26.1
(79) 25.6
(78) 25.6
(78) 25.6
(78)
Precipitation mm (inches) 280
(11.02) 250
(9.84) 230
(9.06) 140
(5.51) 100
(3.94) 50
(1.97) 20
(0.79) 10
(0.39) 10
(0.39) 40
(1.57) 120
(4.72) 130
(5.12) 1,470
(57.87)
Source: .[6]

Transport
The city is served by Juanda International Airport. For trains, the city has several stations. They are Surabaya Kota (better known as Semut) , Pasar Turi, and Gubeng. The main bus terminal is Purabaya (also known as Bungurasih, the area where it is located).

Transportation in Surabaya is supported by the infrastructure of land transport, sea and air that could serve the local trip, regional, and international. The transport of the city is supported by public transport of the city transport, taxis, and the city bus. Surabaya is also a transit city between Jakarta and Bali for ground transportation. Many tourists go through the city of Surabaya for sightseeing before they go back to Jakarta or continue their journey to Bali. Another bus routes are between Jakarta and the neighboring island of Madura.

Tanjung Perak is the main port of the city and is one of the busiest ports in the country. Nowadays, it is also one of the top ten busiest cargo ports in Southeast Asia. Although the port is nearly traditionally administered, it is also used to carry modern cargo ships worldwide. The other port of the city is located in Gresik, a city which is located less than an hour drive from Surabaya city centre to Gresik via highway. In the future, Gresik will be the location for the new harbor and Tanjung Perak will be demolished and will be redeveloped as a recreation area for Surabaya.

Juanda International Airport is the second busiest airport in Indonesia in terms of transit passengers. Many passengers transit through the airport. It is famous as a transit airport between West and East Indonesia and it is also a hub airport of many airlines. In the future, the international airport activities will be removed to the new airport somewhere at Lamongan. However, domestic airport activities will remain at the old airport.

Economy
Plaza Tunjungan, The largest shopping center in Surabaya and one of the biggest in Southeast Asia.The city is one of the busiest ports in the country. Its principal exports include sugar, tobacco and coffee. It has a large shipyard, and numerous specialized naval schools.

As the provincial capital, Surabaya is also home to many offices and business centres. Surabaya’s economy is also influenced by the recent growth in foreign industries and the completion of the Suramadu bridge. Surabaya is currently in the process of building high rise skyscrapers such as apartments, condominiums, and hotels as a way of attracting foreign people to the city.

Surabaya is the main trading port in East Java. Enriched by its facilities, and geography advantages, Surabaya has great economic potential.

Demographics
Surabaya is the second most populous city in Indonesia, after Jakarta, with 2,765,908 recorded in the chartered city limits (kota) in 2010 census.[7] Like many other large Indonesian metropolises, many residents reside outside the city limits in a metropolitan area called Gerbangkertosusila. The city is highly urbanized, due to the many industries located in the city, resulting in many slum areas. As the main education center, Surabaya has been the home for many students from around Indonesia, thus they have created their own community. Also, Surabaya is the commercial center for the eastern Indonesian region, hence many outsiders live in Surabaya.

Ethnicity


Jembatan Merah, near Kya-Kya Kembang Jepun.
Kya-Kya Kembang Jepun, Chinatown in Surabaya.Surabaya is a multi-ethnic city: foreign nationalities represented include Malaysian, Chinese, Indian, Arab, and European. In addition to Javanese and Madurese natives, the city also has representatives of other Indonesian areas: Sunda, Minangkabau, Batak, Banjar, Balinese, and Bugis.

The majority of Surabaya citizens work in retail, whether in the expensive stores in the center city or the many small shops and stalls throughout the metropolis.

Surabaya is an old city that has expanded over time, and its population still grows at approximately 1.2% per year. In recent years, people have been moving from the crowded city center to suburban subdivisions featuring golf courses and strict security.

Language
Most citizens speak a dialect of Javanese called Suroboyoan. A stereotype of this dialect concerns its equality and directness in speech. The usage of register is less strict than the Central Javan dialect. The Surabaya dialect is actively promoted in local media, such as in local TV shows, radio and traditional dramas called Ludruk. The Madurese language influences the Surabayan dialect of Javanese spoken in the streets.

Time
In Indonesia, the keeping of standard time is divided into three time zones, Surabaya follow the Western Indonesian Time/WIT (Indonesian: Waktu Indonesia Barat/WIB) (UTC+7).

Religion
Islam is the most dominant religion in the city. Other religions include Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism

Orthodox Church Service at the St. Demetrios Orthodox Church .Islam
Islam is the main religion in Surabaya.[8]

Orthodox Christianity
The city is also home to the Orthodox Christian Center Surabaya which was opened on the 15th of October 2008 by Father Yohanes Bambang Cahyo Wicaksono an Orthodox Priest.[9] The city is also home to two Orthodox Christian Community centres and there are plans to establish a a kindergarten, High School and University in the medium term. The head Orthodox Church in Indonesia, St Nikolas is also based in Surabaya.[10] On the 12th of January a new Orthodox Orthodox Community center was opened in the Dinoyo district, beside St. Nikolaos Orthodox Church.[11]

Roman Catholicism
The city is the home of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Surabaya.

DollyDolly is a brothel district in Surabaya known throughout in Indonesia, with an estimated 2,000 prostitutes working there.[12] It is the largest lokalisasi (prostitution tolerance zone) in Indonesia,[13] and the largest red-light district in Southeast Asia,[14] and Islamic groups have campaigned to close it. Although it has been forced to move several times in history, it is thought to have been originally founded by a Dutch madam, Dolly van der Mart.[15]

Education
Surabaya has several major universities and other institutions with religious or technical specialties. One of them is Airlangga University (Unair), the oldest, largest, and also best public university in eastern Java, with eleven departments in a variety of fields, including an especially well-regarded medical school, faculty of pharmacy and psychology department. The Tenth of November Institute of Technology is one of the country’s most selective technology institutions, and is well-known for its robotics, mechanical engineering, and marine engineering programs.

As one of the Indonesian military’s major naval ports, Surabaya is the site of the national Naval Military Academy.

Pictures GalleryA building of the Tenth of November Institute of Technology.
A street in Surabaya.

Surabaya’s skyline

Tunjungan Plaza, the largest shopping mall in Surabaya

Bungkul Park.

Bahari Monument.

Ujung Port

the end @ copyright Dr Iwan suwandy 2011